Methodism

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is a religious cult that is well known for its affiliation with thepoor. Wesley was a member of this cult and he was determined to helpthe poor. Though he made many contributions, there were manyshortcomings on the part of the ideologies of the religion.

  1. Importance of the poor to the first generations of

encountered tension generated by the diffusion of democraticegalitarianism1.Thispressure made push towards gospel egalitarianism. Wesleyincorporated into collections for the poor. He often wentpublic begging for the poor. The recognition of the importance ofliving mutually satisfying lives among Methodists gave rise to theirinterest in the poor2.The poor seemed like a leveling factor to show that the cult wasready to observe equality as dictated in the religious book.

Wesleyrealized that many people living in England were low-spirited andfelt unworthy of the love of God, but were an excellent reception toadvancing the word of God. This time was around the era of industrialrevolution. Many people lived and worked in conditions that killedtheir hope and dignity3.Many churches did not accept these classes of individuals, and theydismissed them. The Methodists saw an opportunity of expanding basedon the poor people. It was a religious moral act to do so. Manydiscussions on the influence of have focused on Wesley’svowed dedication to the poor in England. Despite Wesley’s call toservice for the poor, he was a graduate of Oxford, and when he was amissionary in the icountryside,he never lost his academic interests4.

  1. The&nbsppoor, personal wealth and understandings of holiness inverse relation to Wesley and the early Methodists

Therewere many contradictions in the early Methodists church especially onissues concerning the poor, personal wealth, and understanding ofholiness. While most of the Methodist consisted of the effluent andonly about 23% were poor, it was ironical to propose help for peoplewho were outcasts in the church in the first place5.Though the Methodists were moving towards gospel egalitarianism mostwere not ready to observe the full obligations of their religion.Thechurch was apparently divided where there were the indigent and thevery wealthy attending the same church. Wesley wrote a lot concerninghis opinion on wealth poverty and righteousness. His writings have apositive outlook on the ability to redeem the world from sin. Hismotto was that people should earn all they can, save to their maximumpotential and give out all they can. This slogan provided a basis forpersonal and communal holiness.This approach of obedience to Christ’s command gave the community achance to be redeemed. However, working towards holiness by gaining,saving and giving, gave other people a better opportunity to receive,keep and win6.

  1. Emphasis in Wesley

JohnWesley had an impression that certain aspects of the Christian faithneeded rigid emphasis. These areas are still highly observed by theMethodists to the present. He emphasized the biblical nature of humanof all people. According to him, all the people are imperfect beingsblemished by sin. He quoted the Bible in the book of Romans toindicate that people fell short of God’s glory. Just like MartinLuther, Wesley’s own sinful conscious gave his theology a sharpfocus7.

Wesleywas absorbed and passionate about living a religiously dedicatedlife. He had such ruthless religious discipline such that hisreligious commitment could not give him any relief from the thoughtof sin or even make him feel closer to God. Wesley emphasized thatthe people were hopeless as they had fallen short of the glory of Godand they could not change that. He stated that everyone was in needof salvation from sin and its results. However, he stated that peoplecould do nothing to save themselves completely from sin.

Bibliography

Dayton,Donald W.&nbspDiscoveringan evangelical heritage.New York: Harper &amp Row, 1976.

Ehorn,S. M. &quotBook Review: Wesleyan Tradition Commentary On Galatians:George Lyons, Galatians: A Commentary In The Wesleyan Tradition&quot.&nbspTheExpository Times&nbsp124,no. 9 (2013): 452-453.

Kelle,Brad E. &quotDaniel: A Commentary In The Wesleyan Tradition – By JimEdlin&quot.&nbspReligiousStudies Review&nbsp37,no. 1 (2011): 44-44.

1 Dayton, Donald W.&nbspDiscovering an evangelical heritage. New York: Harper &amp Row, 1976.

2 Ehorn, S. M. &quotBook Review: Wesleyan Tradition Commentary On Galatians: George Lyons, Galatians: A Commentary In The Wesleyan Tradition&quot.&nbspThe Expository Times&nbsp124, no. 9 (2013): 452-453.

3Kelle, Brad E. &quotDaniel: A Commentary In The Wesleyan Tradition – By Jim Edlin&quot.&nbspReligious Studies Review&nbsp37, no. 1 (2011): 44-44.

4 Dayton, Donald W.&nbspDiscovering an evangelical heritage. New York: Harper &amp Row, 1976.

5Ehorn, S. M. &quotBook Review: Wesleyan Tradition Commentary On Galatians: George Lyons, Galatians: A Commentary In The Wesleyan Tradition&quot.&nbspThe Expository Times&nbsp124, no. 9 (2013): 452-453.

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6 Kelle, Brad E. &quotDaniel: A Commentary In The Wesleyan Tradition – By Jim Edlin&quot.&nbspReligious Studies Review&nbsp37, no. 1 (2011): 44-44.

7 Dayton, Donald W.&nbspDiscovering an evangelical heritage. New York: Harper &amp Row, 1976.

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