Gender Issues in Depression

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GenderIssues in Depression

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Studiesreveal that women are two times more susceptible depression comparedto men (Nolen-Hoeksema, 2001, p. 173). Similar findings have beenconfirmed across ethnicities, nations, and cultures. Whetherdepression is categorized as subclinical symptoms or a diagnosedmental ailment, women emerge as more vulnerable to becomingdepressed. Depressive disorders that can be diagnosed are exceedinglycommon in women. Research has revealed that the female/male frequencyratio increases as the number of diagnosable symptoms increases(Grigoriadis &amp Robinson, 2007, p. 248). Chronicity of depression,manifested by increased symptom reporting, poor life quality, andpoor social adjustment, affects women more than men. Variousartifacts have been attributed to the female/male ratio. For example,women usually talk about their feelings more than men, women areusually willing to seek help, and women’s symptoms can be diagnosedas depression more readily. Further inquiry into the susceptibilityof women to depression is prudent.

` Thisstudy seeks to develop a comprehensive understanding of thevulnerability of women to depression, compared to men. Theindependent variable here will be depression while the dependentvariable will be men and women. Structured observation will be usedto arrive at the conclusion. The experiment will be conducted at theUniversity’s premises: Students’ Social Hall. Two groups will beselected: the experimental group and the control group. Theexperimental group will be exposed to depressing conditions while thecontrol group will be exposed to non-stressful circumstances.

Dependent

Variable

Experimental Group

Control Group

Independent

Variable

Sample size

Findings

Independent

Variable

Sample size

Findings

Male

A film depicting people being subjected to inhumane conditions

5

4 out of the 5 men did not depict signs of distress. Only one man showed signs of distress, albeit in moderation compared to the women.

A film depicting people living in a community that is hospitable and welcoming.

5

All men maintained a non-impartial expression as they viewed the images on the screen.

Female

A film depicting people being subjected to inhumane conditions

5

All the women seemed shocked and distressed by the events that were transpiring in the film

A film depicting inhabitants in a community that is hospitable and welcoming was shown.

5

All women depicted a cheerful expression as they viewed the images on the screen.

Male

A film showing the depressing conditions that African children are exposed to.

5

All men showed concern for the inhabitable conditions that the children lived in, but none of them was moved to the point of emotional breakdown.

A film showing African children having fun in a festival.

5

All men seemed cheery, as the expressions on their facial expressions, but did not show interest in what the children were doing.

Female

A film showing the depressing conditions that African children are exposed to.

5

All women showed exceedingly high concern for the children and 4 out of the five subjects broke into tears after viewing the images. The remaining subject did not cry, but her facial expression revealed a lot of remorse.

A film showing African children having fun in a festival.

5

All women were cheerful to see the children having fun and even developed an interest in the games that they were playing.

Womenare more vulnerable to the effects of the events that are transpiringamong them. They are more likely to react to events when compared tomen. Thus, in real life situations, women are more likely to becomedepressed by the events that are transpiring in their lives. Men, ingeneral, were less affected by the issues that were occurring aroundthem. Thus, men are less likely to be depressed by the occasions thattranspire in their lives.

References

Grigoriadis,S. &amp Robinson, G. (2007). .&nbspAnnalsOf Clinical Psychiatry,19(4),247-255. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10401230701653294

Nolen-Hoeksema,S. (2001). Gender Differences in Depression, 173. Retrieved fromhttps://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/71710/1467-8721.00142.pdf?sequence=1

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